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Christopher Ross
Christopher Ross

Air Spring !!LINK!!


Continental has released a new air spring catalog for the commercial vehicle aftermarket. There are more than 430 items, including an extensive range of Euro 6 truck applications in the updated catalog. The new catalog includes updated technical data and drawings of all the Continental air springs of the ContiTech brand both online and in the new print version. Here, users, developers and sales partners can find the suitable air spring type for the relevant application.




air spring



Visit the website at www.airspringapp.com or order the six-language print catalog (German, English, French, Spanish, Russian, and Polish) under order number AD 0002 via the contact form or your contact person.


With the simple addition of an Pacbrake air spring / air suspension kit, you can eliminate overtaxing your suspension by providing the extra support of an inflated air spring, resulting in a level stance, comfortable ride and stable handling.


If properly maintained and if regular pressure checks are conducted, the air springs will never have a problem. Pacbrake offers a lifetime warranty on all our air springs.Check the air spring warranty document for more details.


The Air Spring is a self contained unit that replaces your conventional coil spring. You can literally come up with limitless spring rates, both digressive, and progressive, with one unit. Developed initially for Dirt Latemodels where dual and triple rate spring curves are the norm. This devices eliminates un-needed inventory, and even eliminates bump stops. Bump stops are normally run to generate a progressive rate at max travel, because of the volume, you get a natural progressive spring curve!


The Air Spring is a self-contained unit that replaces your conventional coil spring. You can come up with limitless spring rates, both digressive, and progressive, with one unit. Developed initially for Dirt Latemodels where dual and triple rate spring curves are the norm. This devices eliminates un-needed inventory, and even eliminates bump stops. Bump stops are normally run to generate a progressive rate at max travel, because of the volume, you get a natural progressive spring curve!


The Air Spring block represents a generic sealedtranslational pneumatic spring that isolates equipment from shocks and vibrations. Thecompressibility of gas gives air springs desirable isolation performance. Air springsare common in automotive and industrial applications where low spring rate and lownatural frequency are beneficial. Air springs can help you to:


Air springs consist of bellows that confine a column of compressed air or other gas. The airbears the force of the load, and the bellows hold the air. Sealed air springs maintain aconstant mass of air, so the increasing load lowers the volume of air and the resultingspring rate. The reverse is also true. The natural frequency of a sealed air springsystem also depends on this relationship. Due to the large amount of variability in airspring requirements and performance, manufacturers commonly provide pressurecharacteristic tables for each model.


The block takes the relative translational motion between port R andport C to evaluate the air spring height and velocity and uses thisinformation to find the appropriate lookup table entry. The block computes the nonlineareffective force response ΣF(x(t),t), such that:


Vector of spring heights. These values correspond to either the loador stiffness values, depending on the way you choose to parameterize thespring. You must specify a vector that has at least threeelements.


Option to enable a hard stop when the air spring is fully extended. The hard stop occursas the spring reaches the value of the Maximumheight parameter. For more information, see Translational Hard Stop.


Option to enable a hard stop when the air spring is fully extended. The hard stop occursas the spring reaches the value of the Minimumheight parameter. For more information, see Translational Hard Stop.


Distance from full compression or full extension where the effects ofstiffness and damping are partially applied. When you set Hardstop model to Stiffness and damping appliedsmoothly through transition region, damped rebound,the block will smoothly transition the onset of stiffness and damping asthe spring approaches full extension or full compression.


The Type-21 ball valve from Asahi-America has the ability to mount a Series 79 pneumatic actuator to allow for the valve to be controlled via an air supply. Actuators are sized to operate on 80 psi of air pressure, and can be sized to operate on different air pressures upon request. Actuators are available as either air to air (double acting) or air to spring (single acting), with air to spring units having the option to fail either open or closed. The actuators are mounted on the valve through a coupling and bracket set up with an ISO bolt pattern. Units have a visual position indicator and operate as quarter turn actuators. Automation can be performed through optional equipment such as solenoids, positioners or BUS systems.


Air suspension is used in place of conventional steel springs in heavy vehicle applications such as buses and trucks, and in some passenger cars. It is widely used on semi trailers and trains (primarily passenger trains).


The purpose of air suspension is to provide a smooth, constant ride quality, but in some cases is used for sports suspension. Modern electronically controlled systems in automobiles and light trucks almost always feature self-leveling along with raising and lowering functions. Although traditionally called air bags or air bellows, the correct term is air spring (although these terms are also used to describe just the rubber bellows element with its end plates).


On 7 January 1901 the British engineer Archibald Sharp patented a method for making a seal allowing pneumatic or hydraulic apparatus described as a "rolling mitten seal",[1] and on 11 January 1901 he applied for a patent for the use of the device to provide air suspension on bicycles.[2] Further developments using this 1901 seal followed.[3][4] A company called Air Springs Ltd started producing the A.S.L. motorcycle in 1909.[5] This was unusual in having pneumatic suspension at front and rear - rear suspension being unusual in any form of motorcycle at that time. The suspension units were similar to the normal girder forks with the spring replaced by a telescopic air unit which could be pressurised to suit the rider. Production of the motorcycles ceased in 1914.


On 22 January 1901 an American, William W. Humphreys, patented an idea - a 'Pneumatic Spring for Vehicles'.[6] The design consisted of a left and right air spring longitudinally channeled nearly the length of the vehicle. The channels were concaved to receive two long pneumatic cushions. Each one was closed at one end and provided with an air valve at the other end.[7]


In 1950, Air Lift Company patented a rubber air spring that is inserted into a car's factory coil spring. The air spring expanded into the spaces in the coil spring, keeping the factory spring from fully compressing, and the vehicle from sagging. The air springs were also commonly used on NASCAR race cars for many years.[12]


In 1954, Frenchman Paul Magès developed a functioning air/oil hydropneumatic suspension, incorporating the advantages of earlier air suspension concepts, but with hydraulic fluid rather than air under pressure.[13] Citroën replaced the conventional steel springs on the rear axle of their top-of-range model, the Traction Avant 15 Hydraulique.[14] In 1955, the Citroën DS incorporated four wheel hydropneumatic suspension. This combined a very soft, comfortable suspension, with controlled movements, for sharp handling, together with a self-levelling suspension.[15]


In 1958, Buick introduced an optional "Air-Poised Suspension" with four cylinders of air (instead of conventional coil springs) for automatic leveling, as well as a "Bootstrap" control on the dashboard to raise the car 5.5 inches (139.7 millimetres) for use on steep ramps or rutted country roads, as well as for facilitating tire changes or to clean the whitewall tires.[20] For 1959, Buick offered an optional "Air Ride" system on all models that combined "soft-rate" steel coil springs in the front with air springs in the rear.[21]


An optional air suspension system was available on the 1958 and 1959 Rambler Ambassadors, as well as on all American Motors "Cross Country" station wagon models.[22][23] The "Air-Coil Ride" utilized an engine-driven compressor, reservoir, air bags within the coil springs, and a ride-height control, but the $99 optional system was not popular among buyers and American Motors (AMC) discontinued it for 1960.[22][24]


In 1962, the Mercedes-Benz W112 platform featured an air suspension on the 300SE models.[10] The system used a Bosch main valve with two axle valves on the front and one on the rear. These controlled a cone-shaped air spring on each wheel axle. The system maintained a constant ride height utilizing an air reservoir that was filled by a single-cylinder air compressor powered by the engine. In 1964, the Mercedes-Benz 600 used larger air springs and the compressed air system also powered the brake servo.


The air suspension designs from Lincoln, Land Rover, SsangYong, Chrysler, Subaru, Audi, Volkswagen, Tesla, Porsche, and Lexus models feature height adjustable suspension suitable for making it easier to enter the vehicle, clear bumps, or clear rough terrain. The Lincoln Continental, Town Car, Navigator and Mark VIII also featured an air suspension system which offered a controlled but smooth ride. Jaguar and Porsche has taken this to the next level on their XJ and Panamera models, with a system that changes the spring rate and damping settings, among other changes, for their sport/track modes. The Mark VIII suspension settings were also linked to the memory seat system, meaning that the car would automatically adjust the suspension to individual drivers. The control system in the Mark VIII can lower the suspension by about 25 mm (1 inch) at speeds exceeding about 100 km/h (60 mph) for improved aerodynamic performance. One way automakers strive to improve gas mileage is by utilizing active suspension technology. Tesla Motors offers an included "Active Air Suspension" on the Model S and Model X to lower or raise the vehicle for aerodynamics and increased range.[28] 041b061a72


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