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Christopher Ross
Christopher Ross

Bullbat


Before the evening dark had fully set in and bugs swarmed to the screen, there were entertaining sounds in the dusk. The one that I most remember sounded like "peeent." It came from high in the air, and I knew it came from birds, but we called them bullbats.




bullbat


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Think about it. Ecuadorians know the bullbat as well as we. The very same bird that with its "peeent" entertains a watermelon-slurping kid in Texas in July could draw the glance of a mango-munching child in Morona-Santiago, Ecuador, in January. For nighthawks, it's a small hemisphere.


They will be slow returning next spring, probably in late April, but it will be worth the wait to hear again the "peeent" of bullbats high in the dusky sky and remember the symbols of a childhood well spent outdoors.


Pursuing flying insects at dusk and dawn, the Common Nighthawk can be seen flying its floppy flight in rural or urban areas. Its white wing patches and erratic flight make it look like a big bat with headlights, and it is known in some areas as the "bullbat."


268 CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 6. The application of oil to all breeding places after the following plan:Mix 100 gallons of stove distillate and 5 gallons of crude oil. Spray with a special spray every fifteen days from April to November. In July, August,and September spray every twelve days. Crude oil is 12 to 18 Baume, stovedistillate, 28 to 32 Baume. In hot weather the proportion of crude oil maybe increased somewhat. The effort should be to cover the water with an un-broken oily film. The method of applying recommended by Herms is with afive-gallon knapsack spray pump. 7. Treating waters where green scums grow with sulphate of copper, notover one grain to a million of water. 8. Encouraging mosquito killers. Of such are dragon flies, snake doctors,bats, bullbats, and leather wings, and possibly some birds. 9. The encouragement of fish which live on wiggletails. Of such areminnows, shiners, and goldfish. In foreign countries several varieties of fishhave been found efficient. The p


Photograph by G. C. Embody, Ithaca, Xcw York. A NEST OF THE RUFFED GROUSE Great fecundity and a faculty for avoiding its enemies are requirements of a game bird. In this ruffed grouse nest are twenty eggs. it lies close and unseen by the hunter until tlushed and then jumps with some startling noise and flies away swiftly. Thus it requires, on the part of the hunter, stealthiness, keenness, alertness, coolness, quickness, and skill in the manipulation of the gun. Edibility is not a sure prerogative in judging a game bird, for tastes differ; fish-eating herons are relished by some people and a man's appetite in time of stress would make even the proverbial " boiled owl " taste good. The requirement of skill is insufficient in itself, for some of our most valuable insectivorous birds, such as the nighthawk or bullbat, make very difficult targets for the gun. This, then, brings up a third requirement: a game bird must not be more valuable in some other capacity than as game, such, for example, as a destroyer of insects or a beautiful songster. The nighthawk just mentioned, the swallows, the robins, and the meadow larks, which were formerly shot by gunners in many parts of the country, are much more valu- able as destroyers of insects than they are as food for the table or as targets for the hunter. The herons, which only occasionally are valuable as destroyers of insects and often are destructive about fish ponds and trout streams, add too much beauty to our streams and shores to be shot. Their aesthetic value outweighs their value as game, par- ticularly as they are not very good eating and require but little skill in shooting. Another requisite of a game bird is that it must have a large reproductive capacity or a faculty for avoiding its enemies so that it can withstand legitimate hunting without serious diminution in its numbers. The greater the returns in actual sport afforded for the number of birds killed, the better is the game. Those birds which travel in compact flocks, like the ducks and many of the shore- birds, so that more than one can be killed with a single discharge of the gun, are inferior in this respect to the grouse, woodcock, or snipe which get up singly. To sum up, then, the perfect game bird is one that is valuable as food and of little value as a destroyer of vermin; one that


The Goatsuckers of Arkansas. Nighthawk, Whippoorwill, and Chuck-Wills-Widow. GOATSUCKEKS. 51 Nighthawk. Chordeiles virginianus virginanus. The nighthawk, or bullbat, occurs as a common migrant and arare and local summer resident. It arrives from the south aboutthe 20th of April, and migrating individuals are more or less commonfor a month or more. In the fall the southward movement beginslate in August and continues through September, the birds beingmost abundant during the latter month. The species is reported tobreed at Clinton, Pea Ridge, and near Newport. I observed it insmall numbers at Mena (May 24), Pettigrew (June 1), and MammothSpring (June 15). A flock of 10 seen at Womble, May 22, may have


ve never ceased to won-der how these birds, flying high in the air, can pick outa fish and so time their stoop as to strike it with suchcertainty. Toward the northern end of Davie Lake there Is anarrows, and on the slope of a hill on the right-hand sidewe saw a deserted cabin and the lonely grave of a youngtrapper named Allen Harvey, who in 1913 accidentallycut his knee with an axe and died soon after. Some miles below Davie Lake the river widens intoa dead slough that is sometimes known as Long Lake.In this section of the river a particularly broad expanseis called Red Rock Lake, from an immense red boulder.There were a few geese near the entrance to Red RockLake, but they were too wild to permit us to get closeenough for successful shooting. Farther on we disturbeda large flock of grebes, and we also saw a loon or two,and heard several more, while bullbats were almost con-tinually flying overhead, uttering their short, throatyroar. Shallow riffles were now a thing of the past on the


The Goatsuckers of Arkansas. Nighthawk, Whippoorwill, and Chuck-Wills-Widow. GOATSUCKERS. 51 Nighthawk. Chordeiles virginianus virginanus. The nighthawk, or bullbat, occurs as a common migrant and arare and local summer resident. It arrives from the south aboutthe 20th of April, and migrating individuals are more or less commonfor a month or more. In the fall the southward movement beginslate in August and continues through September, the birds beingmost abundant during the latter month. The species is reported tobreed at Clinton, Pea Ridge, and near Newport. I observed it insmall numbers at Mena (May 24), Pettigrew (June 1), and MammothSpring (June 15). A flock of 10 seen at Womble, May 22, may have


GOATSUCKEKS. 51 Nighthawk. Chordeiles virginianus virginanus. The nighthawk, or "bullbat," occurs as a common migrant and a rare and local summer resident. It arrives from the south about the 20th of April, and migrating individuals are more or less common for a month or more. In the fall the southward movement begins late in August and continues through September, the birds being most abundant during the latter month. The species is reported to breed at Clinton, Pea Ridge, and near Newport. I observed it in small numbers at Mena (May 24), Pettigrew (June 1), and Mammoth Spring (June 15). A flock of 10 seen at Womble, May 22, may have 041b061a72


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